What Do I Include in My Application, if I was Fired?



The fact that you were fired isn’t the real deal breaker; after all, it’s how you relate that message to a potential employer that can make or break you during a job search.


Did you know that employers don’t look at a candidate who’s been fired negatively just as much they look at an individual who has quit voluntarily? Perhaps it also doesn’t mean that a hiring manager would look at it quite favorably either. Therefore, you should create the correct messaging the very moment you come across a job posting. It is essential that you plan your job search and the interview process well ahead of time by doing a little research on what others would say in a similar environment. Proper research would give you answers on how to consider and handle the line of questioning if they suddenly rise.


Don’t Bring It Up

It’s important that you don’t bring up the topic of being fired on social media or any content related to the job search. There’s no reason for you to do so and the beginning and end dates of the jobs you’ve had is all you should include in your resume. You don’t have to go deep into detail by explaining and reasoning out why you left. You only got to focus on what you’ve done during your time and the relevant information on the position you held and how you believe those accomplishments and skills would benefit new positions in the future.


If Asked Say This

On the other hand, if you were fired or let go, it is always beneficial to provide a brief description reasoning in a job application as to why you left your previous job. In a matter of what you prefer, you could simply state “ended,” “terminated” or “laid off” in your application. If your main goal is to get on with an interview, this answer is recommended for you. Remember that there are bigger chances in dealing with such questions in person than through paper.



Keep It on Point

Specifics over your termination is something you inevitably will be asked, and when that happens, tell the truth regarding your termination. You might want to explain to avoid further questions and make sure to keep the explanation to the point and concise.


If the particular reason for you to get fired had nothing to do with you (downsizing it later resulted in layoffs), then it would be a natural explanation with no elaboration required. However, if you had something personal to do with the layoff, then you should consider making it as positive as you can and leave any negative language out of the conversation. You don’t have to deride the past employer; mention how much you benefitted and what you have learned from the negative experience and how you plan to change them into a positive career experience in the near future. At this point, it is safe to move on to the next topic, and you should press on to do your best with the rest of the questions.


Getting Fired is Not a Deal Breaker

Many candidates believe that the major deal breaker to a hiring manager is the fact that they were fired from a job. But to be honest, this isn’t the main reason at all. How you have decided to handle over what has happened to you is what’s going to give an impact on how the employer perceives you. Almost everyone has a set of negative experiences, and everyone makes major or minor mistakes. Not everyone is lucky enough to turn a matter towards their benefit. However, if a hiring manager starts looking at you from a side which you are adaptable and stays with a positive mind and would bring those important qualities to the next position, the chances are that you'll get hired right away.


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